Zentangle in the mail

“I always prefer to believe the best of everybody; it saves so much time.”~Rudyard Kipling, English writer

Who doesn’t enjoy fun mail?  I love getting something unique in the mail, even if it’s just the time someone took to put a fresh and funky postage stamp on the envelope.  That’s my  inspiration for Zentangle: It’s in the Mail

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CZT Guys Finse and Purrz prepare for class–note the chocolate

Tonight marked the first Zentangle class I taught at Baker’s Studio, the new scrapbook store in Downtown Farmington, MI.  Students left with two cards and two decorated envelopes. I haven’t taught many card classes in the past, but I like having my students leave with a completed project. These are ready to mail or give along with a gift, complete with a cheery envelope designed to delight the recipient and the postal people.
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Tangles used for envelope decoration

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Students tangling

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Class mosaic of the first tiles

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This was a two-tile class, and both were attached to card blanks. One tile was the traditional random beauty of Zentangle, and the second was a tangled up heart string. Both cards ready for any occasion. The brave part came afterwards: tangling directly on the envelope.
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Students, newbies and even experienced tanglers fear the direct action of commitment. Tangling on a tile is one thing; that can always be removed. Tangling on the envelope, however, signifies that there are no take-backs.

Confidence is scary.

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Yet, take a look at the finished projects. Can you tell which students were unsure of themselves? Which students felt disappointed in their work? Which students felt awesome with their creations?  Which students were surprised?  Everyone interprets Zentangle differently.  As an instructor, I’m here to give them a starting point.  Where the creativity launches from there is all on their own.

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Every student left with two any-occasion cards

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No one could tell who was hesitant, uncertain, scared, excited, powerful, . Every student saw beauty in each tile, especially when someone else’s tangles were drawn completely different from theirs. “I like how this design is smaller and tighter that what I drew.” “I like the composition here.” “This one flows.” “This one is really big and open.”

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Students admiring their artistic creations

One thing everyone could agree on, whether they meant their own tile or someone else’s: “This is beautiful.” Everyone doubted themselves for no reason at all.
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Confidence is empowering.

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The completed class cards and envelopes

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